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>> down through history, all people have struggled for land. in israel, however, the struggle takes on yet another dimension. somehow, the land is infused with the holy, and the quest for sovereignty, for political peace, is wrapped up in identity and relationship. in fact, as we talk to religious leaders, political leaders, and the average person on the street, we'll find out that sorting out this difficult and tangled issue over land is really the key to pce in israel in the future. in order to get a better understanding of land issues in israel, we were very fortunate to speak with dr. menachem lorberbaum at the hartman institute, where he's director of the center for jewish political thought. this center provides a voice of reason and passionate understanding in a society that is increasingly polarized by issues over land, religion, the ethical dimension, and its impact on society. >> well, the issue of land has been an issue for a century also in the zionist movement. first of all, sovereignty needs territory. sovereignty presumes territory. and therefore, the question of terri
of the tensions between religion, and the spot we picked on, dare i say, was israel and then to some extent egypt. and we wanted to go to israel in particular because there isn't such a diverse cultural environment in terms of religion, so that the tensions are, in some senses, watered down. as we all know, unless you've been meditating in a cave for the past 20 years, israel and the social environment in israel is very tense in terms of the relationship between the three great faiths that actually share something of a cultural tradition- judaism, christianity, and islam. and so what we- we have an extraordinary opportunity, and something like a great risk. i'm surprised david ainsworth, our executive producer, hasn't come out and read this e-mail message i sent to him about three days before we're ready to go on this journey. we planned it of course for several months. we're talking about a crew of at least six people- a lot of preparation, and of course, at the time when we were set to go was one of the worst possible times in terms of the tension; you know, again, another flare-up between the
'll be talking about the destructive conflict in israel and gaza and the heroic people trying to stop it. we'll be talking about hostess and how a greater gluttony of those who eat hostess is the gluttony of those who run the company. we'll be talking about obama's asia trip, marco rubio flirting with creationism and when the indians first gave the pilgrims all that food on the first thanksgiving, it marked the dawn of socialism for undocumented immigrants. let's go to lisa ferguson for our current news update. >> thanks, john. president obama is on the last leg of his trip through southeast asia right now. he spent the day in cambodia where he met with both japanese prime minister noke sheet ta notah. both the east asia summit. obama spoke about the importance of strengthening the u.s./japanese alliance. when it comes to china as the two largest global economies both china and the united states have a responsibility to ensure sustained and balanced economic growth. this is the president's first trip abroad since his re
-determination of israelis and palestinians. as you know, every american president since lyndon johnson tried to stop israel from building settlements on the west bank because they understood those settlements threatened to fore close the possibility of a two-state solution. some presidents pushed hard; some not very hard. at camp david, jimmy carter believed he received assurances that building would stop and self-determination and would commence, but settlement building did not stop and carter and the egyptians for different reasons did not make too much of a fuss. ronald reagan called for a settlement freeze without making a big issue of it. george hw bush made an issue of it paying a steep political price which may have cost him re-election. bill clinton wanted a viable state, and he found settlement building cometted whether israel was headed by labor, and, indeed, accelerated throughout the 1990s. barack obama made a settlement freeze that jumping off point for his peace efforts, and he was smacked down decisively by benjamin netanyahu. the reason is obvious. israel, no matter what coalition was in ch
setback for the u.s. and israel. th the territories on the west bank, the jordan river, and along the gaza strip are home to palestinians displaced by the war that created israel in 1948. today's vote doesn't create an independent palestine. that would have to come in negotiations with israel. jim axelrod is at the u.n. for us tonight. jim. >> reporter: well, scott, the palestinian authority become just the second non-member state designated by the united nations. the vatican is the other. the palestinians are viewing this elevation of status as an historic step, just to have any kind of recognition of statehood. palestinian authority president mahmoud abbas, who was also the first palestinian authority prime minister, rejected last- minute appeals from the united states to reconsider his push for this recognition. >> ( translated ): the united nations general assembly is called upon today to issue the birth certificate of the reality of the state of palestine. >> reporter: now, we are not talking about full status as united nations member nation. that would require the approval of the sec
prime minister salam fayyad. he's in washington to attend the 2012 saban forum on u.s./israel relations. it's my understanding you were against this at first. is that true? and if so, how do you feel now? >> no. i never was against it. as a matter of fact, i was very much a part of the thinking -- >> did you think it was time now? or some time down in the future? >> given the frustrations that we palestinians have had with the political process, it has not been productive. there's no question that we needed to pursue any and all available options to us. and the international law -- with the national diplomacy. and this was one of them. the question for me all along was how best to do it. provide us with some leverage going forward because what we really want end of day is genuine state where our people can live as free people with dignity. >> at the end we were just talking in the break, does this end up helping or hurting your relationship with the united states, your pursuit of something even more tangible? >> i think it depends a lot on what is done to deal with it. and whether or no
right, my top issue is that there's all this controversy about whether or not israel is going to go to war with iran. and when president obama spoke about the big yellow bird, i don't think he was talking about the big yellow bird, i think he was talking, you know, big bird on tv, i think he was talking about china. china, you know, chinese people, oriental people are referred to as yellow. china has the largest population on earth, a billion people. they have so many people that they force women to have abortions. they have no respect for human life at all. and china is friends with iran. china is trading partners with iran. if we help israel go to war with iran, then we're going to have to deal with an angry china, and i think that's a really big problem, and we have to just put a stop to it and negotiate peace. >> well, as i said in the opening statement that, um, i really feel that our biggest problem is the deficit, but i believe that the reason why we haven't been able to, um, to lower the national debt is because our political system is broken. and we need to fix it, or this
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7

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